“Tree Wall” In National Capital To Act As Guard Against Dust Storms From Its Western Sides

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Published by Vijay Singh on 10 Jul 2018

As per latest reports, Delhi is to encompass a wall of almost 31 lakh native trees surrounding it shortly to protect it from everyday dust storms coming from the state of Rajasthan and surrounding and suffocating it.

A senior representative of the Union Ministry of Forest, Environment and Climate Change told media people that diverse agencies of the Union and Delhi administrations have already started the work of sowing almost 31 lakh plantlets of diverse native species on its three sides to save the national capital from the problem of everyday dust storms from its western sides.

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The natural fence is to come up all along Delhi boundary with the states of Haryana, Rajasthan as well as Uttar Pradesh. They will also cover the Aravali and the Yamuna forests regions.

The official listed stated that the plan has two aims – assimilation of pollution-causing particulate matters by trees and protecting the national capital from the harsh dirt filled storms.

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He stated that based on technical researches, adequately tall and thick trees of “pilkhan, goolar, mango, mahua” and other inhabitant trees have been selected for this system. All these trees stop the dust element from rising above in the sky because of low atmospheric force and discontinue them from compressing at few meters over the ground, he added.

Other trees included in the plan are “pepul, neem, banyan, berry, amla (Indian gooseberry), jamun, amltash, harre, bahera” and other trees that discharge more Oxygen.

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“Minute dust particles and other pollutants of the air easily get deposited on the leaves of evergreen trees and are subsequently washed down to the ground and mix up with soil during rains. Accordingly, this scheme may prove to be an effective and permanent solution to the malady of air pollution,” the official told.

Once these saplings get planted, these governmental agencies are expected to take care of them, and from March next year, the Dehradun-based Forest Research Institute will accomplish a “survival of audit” of all the plantlets used.

It will forward its details the very next year by May 2020.

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